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Maryland Department of Health

CovidCONNECT

Resources

Welcome to the Covid Connect support pages. These resources were compiled and organized by MDH’s Behavioral Health Administration (BHA) and the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) Maryland to give you the most helpful information and tools to cope with anxiety, depression, grief, and other behavioral health challenges during this already challenging time. From self care to crisis care, find the support, information, and resources you and your loved ones may need.

holding hands

There are many reasons to seek help. The threshold for reaching out, and getting checked out, should be low. It is better to be safe than sorry. Explore these options for getting connected to mental health or substance use services, check out the crisis services map, or contact Maryland’s Helpline now: call 211 and press 1, text 898-211, or visit pressone.211md.org.

From FAQs to info sheets, webinars and resource guides, this section includes links to behavioral health resources developed in response to the pandemic.

Tree with dual emotions of light and dark
stressed out man

Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations. Fortunately, being proactive about your mental health can help to keep both your mind and body stronger. Learn more about getting good sleep, relaxation techniques, exercise, nutrition and other wellness tips to cope with stress.

Feelings of fear, sadness and uncertainty are normal during a pandemic. The emotional impact of an emergency can vary depending on your experiences, social and economic circumstances, availability of local resources, and other factors. People can become more distressed if they see repeated reports about the pandemic in the media. However, if your feelings interfere with your daily activities for several days in a row, you may need professional support.

anxiety spelled out in a puzzle
sad woman looking out window

Grief is the natural reaction to loss. Grief is both a universal and a personal experience. Loss can include the death of a loved one, the ending of an important relationship, job loss, loss through theft, or the loss of independence through disability. Everyone has a different reaction to loss, but some common signs of grief include changes in sleep patterns or appetite, difficulty concentrating or making decisions, low self-esteem or self-destructive thoughts.

Children react, in part, to what they see from the adults around them. When parents and caregivers deal with the COVID-19 calmly and confidently, they can provide the best support for their children. Parents can be more reassuring to others around them, especially children, if they are better prepared.

girl in a mask
women with masks on

Due to social determinants of health, minority populations have experienced a greater disruption to their lives during the COVID-19 crisis. Higher rates of infection and fatality are linked to existing health disparities that affect minority communities.

Here is a space for other important resources, like the Federal Trade Commission’s page on avoiding coronavirus scams.

woman with mask on
holding hands

There are many reasons to seek help. The threshold for reaching out, and getting checked out, should be low. It is better to be safe than sorry. Explore these options for getting connected to mental health or substance use services, check out the crisis services map, or contact Maryland’s Helpline now: call 211 and press 1, text 898-211, or visit pressone.211md.org.

Tree with dual emotions of light and dark

From FAQs to info sheets, webinars and resource guides, this section includes links to behavioral health resources developed in response to the pandemic.

stressed out man

Everyone reacts differently to stressful situations. Fortunately, being proactive about your mental health can help to keep both your mind and body stronger. Learn more about getting good sleep, relaxation techniques, exercise, nutrition and other wellness tips to cope with stress.

anxiety spelled out in a puzzle

Feelings of fear, sadness and uncertainty are normal during a pandemic. The emotional impact of an emergency can vary depending on your experiences, social and economic circumstances, availability of local resources, and other factors. People can become more distressed if they see repeated reports about the pandemic in the media. However, if your feelings interfere with your daily activities for several days in a row, you may need professional support.

sad woman looking out window

Grief is the natural reaction to loss. Grief is both a universal and a personal experience. Loss can include the death of a loved one, the ending of an important relationship, job loss, loss through theft, or the loss of independence through disability. Everyone has a different reaction to loss, but some common signs of grief include changes in sleep patterns or appetite, difficulty concentrating or making decisions, low self-esteem or self-destructive thoughts.

girl in a mask

Children react, in part, to what they see from the adults around them. When parents and caregivers deal with the COVID-19 calmly and confidently, they can provide the best support for their children. Parents can be more reassuring to others around them, especially children, if they are better prepared.

women with masks on

Due to social determinants of health, minority populations have experienced a greater disruption to their lives during the COVID-19 crisis. Higher rates of infection and fatality are linked to existing health disparities that affect minority communities.

woman with mask on

Here is a space for other important resources, like the Federal Trade Commission’s page on avoiding coronavirus scams.